Tag Archives: deconversion

Time machine: January 22, 2008

I haven’t been an atheist for long, really.

Back at the beginning of 2008, on an old (and long-since-defunct) blog of mine, I posted the following. It was one of the last things I wrote publicly as a believer, and I was barely a believer at that. I was on a lot of online forums, arguing with devout believers about the things they believed that didn’t make sense to me.

It’s interesting to look back on it now and see myself struggling with different ideas. I’ve overcome the challenges I faced then and become a much more content person, but this little glimpse into the past could provide some helpful insight, I think, to people who wonder what it’s like to go from believer to nonbeliever. (By April of the next year, I’d posted about why I was an atheist. Somewhere in the middle of that, I’d lost the last dregs of my faith.)

Without further ado:

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Fastest deconversion ever?

Eight days ago, a lifelong Christian posted on Reddit’s /r/atheism forum, saying that he was going to spend a week trying to think like an atheist, so he could get to better understand our perspective. Yesterday, he wrote a follow-up post summarizing the experience. In short: he no longer considers himself a Christian, distrusts the authority of the Bible, and has tons of questions (about his own Christian beliefs) left unanswered.

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Am I smarter as an atheist than I was as a Christian?

Reader Alex recently asked a question in a comment on an older post:

Hi Mike, I’m sorry for my hard words, but there is no other way to tell it. I just read what you say in “About Me”. The very important question that you should pose to yourself some day, when you feel strong, is the following: Considering that just very recently I was stupid enough to be fundamentalist Christian, how can I be now so sure that being an Atheist is very intelligent?

In other words, if I was so wrong before, how can I know I’m right now? It’s a perfectly fair question, and it’s one I’ve asked myself several times. And there are several reasons I think I’m smarter now.

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